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Article ID: 698339

Aug. 1 marks the beginning of World Breastfeeding Week. Cynthia Garrison, a @UPMCnews lactation consultant, can discuss breastfeeding myths and options for all moms.

Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

Released:
31-Jul-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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    31-Jul-2018 10:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 697840

Soccer Heading Worse for Women’s Brains than for Men’s

Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Women’s brains are much more vulnerable than men’s to injury from repeated soccer heading, according to a new study by researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, part of Montefiore. The study found that regions of damaged brain tissue were five times more extensive in female soccer players than in males, suggesting that sex-specific guidelines may be warranted for preventing soccer-related head injuries. The results were published online today in Radiology.

Released:
24-Jul-2018 1:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 698248

Loyola Offering Intraoperative Radiation Therapy to Broad Range of Cancer Patients

Loyola University Health System

Loyola Medicine is among the select centers that offer a broad range of cancer patients a leading-edge form of radiation therapy that is delivered during surgery.

Released:
30-Jul-2018 1:25 PM EDT
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Article ID: 698226

Predicting Heart Attack, Stroke Risk Just Got Easier

UT Southwestern Medical Center

A team of researchers led by cardiologists at UT Southwestern Medical Center has developed a new online tool to more accurately predict who among those ages 40-65 is at the highest risk of suffering a heart attack or stroke in the next 10 years.

Released:
30-Jul-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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    30-Jul-2018 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 697920

Scientists Discover a Dynamic Cellular Defense Against Breast Cancer Invasion

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins researchers report they have demonstrated in mouse tissue grown in the lab that the cell layer surrounding breast milk ducts reaches out to grab stray cancer cells to keep them from spreading through the body. The findings reveal that this cell layer, called the myoepithelium, is not a stationary barrier to cancer invasion, as scientists previously thought, but an active defense against breast cancer metastasis.

Released:
26-Jul-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 698139

Do Obese Patients Have a Higher Risk of Infection and Dying After Colon Surgery?

Diseases of the Colon and Rectum Journal

In a study published in the August issue of Diseases of the Colon & Rectum, investigators from the University of Alabama at Birmingham sought to answer this question. While it has been long recognized that heavy patients are at higher risk of complications after surgery, Dr. Wahl and his colleagues wanted to find out whether there was a difference whether a patient was merely pudgy or downright obese.

Released:
30-Jul-2018 7:05 AM EDT
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    30-Jul-2018 7:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 697918

Opioids and Older Adults: Poll Finds Support for Prescribing Limits, and Need for Better Counseling and Disposal Options

Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Nearly a third of older adults have received a prescription for an opioid pain medicine in the past two years, but a new poll shows many didn’t get enough counseling about the risks that come with them, how to reduce use, when to switch to a non-opioid, or what to do with leftovers. Nearly three-quarters support limits on how many opioids a doctor can prescribe at once.

Released:
25-Jul-2018 10:10 AM EDT
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Article ID: 698140

What Is Important to Patients Undergoing Colorectal Surgery?

Diseases of the Colon and Rectum Journal

What do patients really want? These are Important questions that doctors at the University of Vermont have tried to answer. In the August issue of Diseases of the Colon & Rectum, Dr. Wrenn and his colleagues surveyed 167 patients who had undergone a colorectal resection between 2009 and 2015.

Released:
30-Jul-2018 6:55 AM EDT
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Article ID: 698179

WVU Experts Are Available to Talk About Food-Safety Regulations and How to Prevent Foodborne Illnesses

West Virginia University

West Virginia University expert Simon Haeder says the massive increases in food recall over the last five years-- 92.7 percent for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and 83.4 percent for the U.S. Department of Agriculture (according to a study by the Stericycle Recall Index)-- could be attributed to alterations in agency regulations. Another WVU expert, Jacek Jaczynski, said it’s simple to avoid illness by washing hands and thoroughly cooking food.

Released:
27-Jul-2018 3:40 PM EDT
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Article ID: 698177

WVU Expert Says Water on Mars Would Be Extremely Acidic but Could Host Life

West Virginia University

With new and compelling evidence for water existing beneath the south pole of Mars, a West Virginia University professor says this underground lake is likely to be extremely salty and more acidic than battery acid. Life forms that can survive in extreme physical and geochemical conditions are found in abundance in acid salt lakes such as those in Chile and western Australia, she said.

Released:
27-Jul-2018 3:05 PM EDT
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