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Article ID: 1848

Making The Multimedia Future A Reality

National Science Foundation (NSF)

In the next century, a personal computer could know from the inflection in your voice -- or by a smile or frown -- what you want it to do. Basic research in multimedia technology funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) is moving us much closer to that reality.

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14-Feb-1997 12:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 1847

Biggest Earthquakes Of '96 Rattle China, Indonesia

US Geological Survey (USGS)

China and Indonesia suffered the deadliest and most destructive earthquakes in 1996, while the U.S. remained relatively quiet according to scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior. The last deadly earthquake in the U.S. was the 1994 Northridge, Calif., quake that took 60 lives.

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14-Feb-1997 12:00 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    14-Feb-1997 12:00 AM EST

Article ID: 1831

Symmetry at its Smallest

University of California, Santa Cruz

Symmetries are evident everywhere in nature, even at the smallest scales of subatomic particles. At the AAAS meeting in Seattle, physicist Michael Dine will describe the latest work toward a theory of supersymmetry, which could round out the Standard Model of particle physics.

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13-Feb-1997 12:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 1846

Global Climate Change Reduces Variety of Life

US Geological Survey (USGS)

A half-million-year record of some deep-water cousins of crabs called ostracodes provides some of the strongest evidence yet that global climate change can reduce the variety of life forms on Earth, according to a report released Thursday (Feb. 13, 1997).

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14-Feb-1997 12:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 1844

Mars-Rock Still Points Toward Past Life

University of Georgia

ATHENS, Ga. -- Last August, a group of scientists stunned the scientific world with evidence that life may have once existed on Mars. Their analysis of a Martian meterorite concluded that microscopic life may have been the source of "apparent" fossils it held. In the six months since then, several studies have questioned their interpretations. In a speech today (SATURDAY, 2/15, EMBARGOED) at the annual meeting of the AAAS, a key researcher in the original project called dismissals of the claims entirely premature.

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13-Feb-1997 12:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 1843

Tensegrities Help Understand Toys, Molecules

Cornell University

Tensegrity structures that bounce back to shape after being deformed require complicated mathematics, a Cornell expert told an audience at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Embargo Date: 02/14.97

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13-Feb-1997 12:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 1842

Gold: Life on Mars May Still Exist

Cornell University

Life on Mars probably did and may still exist, a Cornell astronomer says. Mars, like Earth, has a "deep, hot biosphere" teeming with microbial life well beneath the surface, Tom Gold told the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Embargo Date: 02/13/97

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13-Feb-1997 12:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 1841

Cornell Researchers Combat The Onion Bulb Mite

Cornell University

The onion bulb mite -- Rhizoglyphus robini -- has begun to attack some of New York's prized onion fields. Cornell University scientists are studying management techniques to control it.

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13-Feb-1997 12:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 1840

'Birdsource' Website For Citizen-Science Data

Cornell University

One of the most comprehensive World Wide Web sites for amateur bird-watchers and professional ornithologists, BirdSource, opened for business Feb. 14 by accepting data from participants in Project FeederWatch at http://www.ornith.cornell.edu/CS/PFW/main.html. Co-managed by the Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology and the National Audubon Society and constructed by the Cornell Theory Center, the Web site was demonstrated at the Seattle annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Embargo Date: 02/14/97

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Article ID: 1839

Cornell Ornithologist Lauds Use Of Volunteers

Cornell University

Hundreds of students in schools across the United States are helping biologists research questions about birds, a Cornell University ornithologist told an American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) session on classroom science Feb. 16. When scientists and school children collaborate, everyone gains, said Andre Dhondt. Embargo Date: 02/16/97

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13-Feb-1997 12:00 AM EST
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