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Article ID: 1788

Participative Management Hurts Employee Relations

Ohio State University

One of the hot new trends in management -- worker participation -- has been touted as a boon to employees because it allows them to play an active role in making decisions involving their jobs. But such management systems, which often involve workplace teams, may hurt relations among co-workers, a new study suggests.

Released:
6-Feb-1997 12:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 1781

Big 'winners' may play a different game

University of Alabama Huntsville

The biggest winners in an investment market may be playing the game according to their own rules, rather the "rational" economic rules followed by most investors.

Released:
5-Feb-1997 12:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 1749

Foundation Reports On Business Schools: Damaging?

Rutgers, State University of New Jersey, Graduate School of Management

The 1959 Ford and Carnegie reports on business schools caused severe and probably permanent damage to business education, forcing it into a narrow and overly-theoretical mold, says dr. Carter Daniel, of Rutgers Graduate School of Management, in his forthcoming book "MBA: The First Century."

Released:
31-Jan-1997 12:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 1748

Do Black Women Managers Have To Act White?

Rutgers, State University of New Jersey, Graduate School of Management

Black women managers exhibit characteristics that give them exceptional strength, says Assistant Professor DT Ogilvie of Rutgers Graduate School of Management. They are more likely to have male-associated traits as well as female ones, to sense gender inequality strongly, to be able to handle several roles at once, and to break down traditional constraints.

Released:
31-Jan-1997 12:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 1713

Community Impact of Proposed Dam in Thailand Investigated

Resources for the Future (RFF)

Researchers from Resources for the Future in the United States and Chulalongkorn University in Thailand today announce the start of their collaborative investigation of a proposed dam's impact on local forest communities -- an impact that is often not accounted for in development planning in Southeast Asia.

Released:
23-Jan-1997 12:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 1703

End Irrigation Subsidies And Reward Conservation

Cornell University

Unless the world's food-growing nations improve their resource-management practices, life in the 21st century will be as tough as it is now in the 80 countries that already suffer serious water shortages, a new Cornell University study warns. As a start, governments should end irrigation subsidies that encourage inefficient use of water and instead reward conservation.

Released:
22-Jan-1997 12:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 1055

Road To Peace In The Middle East: Economic?

Rutgers, State University of New Jersey, Graduate School of Management

Economic cooperation offers the Middle East such clear benefits that it will eventually prevail over hostility. Jerry Rosenberg, Professor and Chair of International Business at Rutgers, and an active participant at mid-east economic summits, has a model for such cooperation.

Released:
18-Jan-1997 12:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 1054

Do Japanese Manager Western Workers Differently?

Rutgers, State University of New Jersey, Graduate School of Management

Japanese managers are more likely to use reason, reciprocity, and rewards--and to be more controlling--in dealing with Western subordinates, says Asha Rao, Assistant Professor of Managemnent at Rutgers Graduate School of Management.

Released:
18-Jan-1997 12:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 1045

Report Maps "Next Generation" Survival Issues

Agility Forum

In a 15-month study, more than 50 leading U.S. manufacturers joined with academic researchers and government experts to identify forces likely to shape competition into the next century. Rapid marketplace change, the Next Generation Manufacturing Project concludes, will require an unprecedented shift in how manufacturers employ and train workers, use information technology, and design plants and equipment.

Released:
17-Jan-1997 12:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 1014

In Alaska, A New Net Protects Juvenile Fish

Wildlife Conservation Society

Wildlife Conservation Society researcher develops a new trawl net that drastrically reduces the number of undersized fish caught in the high-volume commercial pollock fishery -- the world's largest trawl fishery. In the U.S. alone, pollock catches $6 billion in 1994. This new net will affect this industry with in the next year.

Released:
11-Jan-1997 12:00 AM EST
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