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Article ID: 695081

University of North Florida Materials Science and Engineering Research Facility Demonstrates State-of-the-Art TESCAN Biological Microscope

University of North Florida

The University of North Florida Materials Science and Engineering Research Facility has partnered with TESCAN, a leading manufacturer of electron and light microscopes, in the installation of one of its new Q-Phase microscopes, a unique instrument for quantitative phase imaging based on holographic microscopy.

Released:
24-May-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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    24-May-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 695064

A System of Check and Balances in the Blood

University of Vienna

Hematopoietic Stem Cells (HSCs) give rise to blood and immune cells of the body, and are therefore essential for our survival. They are in a dormant state, but whenever new blood needs to be formed, such as after blood loss or chemotherapy, they are rapidly activated to compensate for the loss. After completing their mission, they need to go back to their dormant state. The group of Manuela Baccarini at the Max F. Perutz Laboratories, a joint venture of the University of Vienna and the Medical University of Vienna, has now shown how intracellular signalling can safeguard this delicate balance between activation and dormancy. Their results are published in the prominent journal Cell Stem Cell.

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24-May-2018 4:00 AM EDT
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    24-May-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 695063

Cancer Cells Co-Opt Pain-Sensing ‘Wasabi Receptor’ to Survive Oxidative Stress

Harvard Medical School

Some cancers express unusually high levels of a neural calcium channel known as the ‘wasabi receptor,’ which plays a role in detecting pain, cold and other sensations. New research finds cancer cells co-opt this neural channel to increase their tolerance against toxic oxidative stress.

Released:
23-May-2018 10:05 PM EDT
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    24-May-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 694888

A Cascade of Immune Processes Offers Insights to Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Researchers at the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center have discovered that tumor cells reprogram metabolic pathways to gain control over a type of immune cell that allows cancer growth.

Released:
21-May-2018 3:45 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695077

American Association of Critical-Care Nurses Outlines Expected Practices to Manage Clinical Alarms

American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN)

Approximately 90 percent of alarms in various critical care settings are either false or clinically irrelevant. An AACN Practice Alert outlines evidence-based protocols and clinical strategies that healthcare organizations can implement as they seek ways to reduce false or nonactionable alarms and improve the effective use of these monitoring aids.

Released:
24-May-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 695073

By Forming Clots in Tumors, Immune Cell AIDS Lung Cancer's Spread

University of North Carolina Health Care System

In the journal Nature Communications, researchers report for a particular subset of lung cancer tumors, there is a high prevalence of immune cells called inflammatory monocytes. These immune cells, which normally help to build clotting scaffolds to promote wound healing, also make it possible for tumor cells to migrate and spread to other parts of the body.

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24-May-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 695071

Study Finds Black Americans Face Education, Income Barriers to Healthy Behaviors

University of Iowa

A new University of Iowa–led study reports educational opportunities and higher incomes may be key to closing the health gap between most black and white Americans. Researchers say socioeconomic factors, mainly wealth and education, influenced the differences in health behaviors between the groups more than other variables.

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24-May-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 695078

Cracking the Code of Superconductivity and Magnetism

Department of Energy, Office of Science

Neutron probes and theory reveal how electrons cooperate at lower temperatures.

Released:
24-May-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 695070

Breast Cancer Survivors Aren’t Getting Recommended Number of Mammograms Post-Surgery, Study Finds

National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®)

A new study in JNCCN finds that, contrary to screening recommendations, mammography rates decline over time as women get further out from their breast cancer diagnosis; African-American women in particular were less likely to receive the recommended amount of screening.

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24-May-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 694996

Distinguished Global Health Leader Joins the George Washington University

George Washington University

The Milken Institute School of Public Health (Milken Institute SPH) at the George Washington University today announced that Adnan A. Hyder, MD, MPH, PhD, will join the school on August 15 as the Senior Associate Dean for Research and Professor of Global Health.

Released:
24-May-2018 9:45 AM EDT
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