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  • Embargo expired:
    7-Jun-2018 12:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 695698

Consumers Beware: High User ‘Star Ratings’ Don’t Mean A Mobile Medical App Works (B-roll)

Johns Hopkins Medicine

By screening 250 user reviews and comments for a once popular -- but proven inaccurate -- mobile app claiming to change your iPhone into a blood pressure monitor, Johns Hopkins researchers have added to evidence that a high “star rating” doesn’t necessarily reflect medical accuracy or value.

Released:
6-Jun-2018 1:15 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695707

Antibody Blocks Inflammation, Protects Mice from Hardened Arteries and Liver Disease

University of California San Diego Health

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine discovered that they can block inflammation in mice with a naturally occurring antibody that binds oxidized phospholipids (OxPL), molecules on cell surfaces that get modified by inflammation. Even while on a high-fat diet, the antibody protected the mice from arterial plaque formation, hardening of the arteries and liver disease, and prolonged their lives.

Released:
6-Jun-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695653

Identifying a Subgroup of Heart Failure Patients Could Lead to Improved Care

University of Alabama at Birmingham

For decades, oxidative stress was linked to heart failure. Now in a clinical study, researchers find that a subgroup of heart failure patients have a hyper-reductive state, called reductive stress. Thus, the subgroup may benefit from personalized antioxidant therapies.

Released:
5-Jun-2018 4:45 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695649

CRF Invites NYC Women of All Ages to Attend Free Seminar on Healthy Aging of the Heart

Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF)

The Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) will hold a free seminar, “Healthy Aging: What Women Need to Know About Heart Health at Every Age,” on Thursday, June 14, 2018 in New York City. The seminar, part of a series of Mini-Med School seminars conducted by the CRF Women’s Heart Health Initiative, will focus on providing women with practical ways to keep their heart healthy at all stages of life. Attendees will learn about lifestyle changes, risk factors, and treatment options for coronary artery disease and aortic stenosis, two conditions that develop as you age.

Released:
5-Jun-2018 4:30 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695518

WVU researcher receives NIH grant to explore effects of fracking on cardiovascular health

West Virginia University

Travis Knuckles, assistant professor in the West Virginia University School of Public Health, has received $450,000 from the National Institutes of Health to investigate how airborne particles can affect human health.

Released:
5-Jun-2018 8:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    5-Jun-2018 7:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 695179

Clinical Trials in a Dish: A Perspective on the Coming Revolution in Drug Development

SLAS (Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening)

Researchers share perspective about Clinical Trials in a Dish (CTiD), a novel strategy that bridges preclinical testing and clinical trials.

Released:
30-May-2018 1:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 695585

Researchers Successfully, Safely Lengthen Intervals Between Blood Draws For Warfarin Patients

Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A new study finds stable patients on blood thinners may not need to get their blood drawn as often as they currently do. Researchers were able to increase the number of people waiting longer than five weeks in between their INR blood draws from less than half (41.8%) to more than two-thirds (69.3%).

Released:
4-Jun-2018 5:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695572

Loyola Medicine Offering Free Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

Loyola University Health System

More than one million Americans are living with an undiagnosed silent killer called an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). On Saturday, June 9, Loyola Medicine will hold a free ultrasound screening for people at risk for AAAs.

Released:
4-Jun-2018 3:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695547

Dr. William O. Suddath Named Chairman of Cardiology at MedStar Southern Maryland Hospital Center

MedStar Heart & Vascular Institute and the Cleveland Clinic Heart and Vascular Institute

MedStar Heart & Vascular Institute is pleased to announce that William O. Suddath, MD, is the new chairman of Cardiology and medical director of the cardiac catheterization laboratory at MedStar Southern Maryland Hospital Center.

Released:
4-Jun-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    4-Jun-2018 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 695476

New Research Sparks Call for Guidelines Around High-Intensity Interval Training

Les Mills

New research has for the first time set a recommended upper limit of High-Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) at 30-40 minutes working out at above 90 percent of the maximum heart rate per week. The study findings – presented by Associate Professor Jinger Gottschall at the 2018 American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) Annual Meeting this month – provide evidence that any more than 30-40 minutes of HIIT in a maximum training zone per week can reduce performance and potentially result in a greater risk of injury.

Released:
1-Jun-2018 6:00 PM EDT
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