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Article ID: 696640

Research team receives NSF climate change grant

Cornell College

The National Science Foundation has awarded the team more than $676,ooo to study stalagmites from caves in central and southern Portugal as a means of investigating how rainfall changed over decades and centuries starting 2,500 years ago.

Released:
26-Jun-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 696615

Proteins Found in Semen Increase the Spread of Ebola Virus Infection

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Protein fragments, called amyloid fibrils, in human semen significantly increase Ebola virus infection and protect the virus against harsh environmental conditions such as heat and dehydration. Follow-up studies from the 2014 epidemic found that men can harbor the virus in their semen for at least 2.5 years, with the potential to transmit the virus sexually during that time. Targeting amyloids in semen may prevent a sexually transmitted spread of the Ebola virus.

Released:
25-Jun-2018 3:50 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696580

Mississippi State’s Fitzkee garners $1.8 million NIH grant to study bacteria, surfaces and infections

Mississippi State University

A Mississippi State faculty member and structural biophysicist is the recipient of a $1.8 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to study how bacterial proteins attach to surfaces and impact public health.

Released:
25-Jun-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 696509

Lethal Prostate Cancer Treatment May Benefit from Combination Immunotherapy

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center and the Bloomberg~Kimmel Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy (BKI) released a study investigating the use of combination checkpoint immunotherapy in the treatment of a lethal form of advanced prostate cancer. The study suggested a genetic subset of prostate cancer may benefit from this form of immunotherapy.

Released:
25-Jun-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    25-Jun-2018 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 696245

Researchers Identify Brain Cells Responsible for Removing Damaged Neurons After Injury

The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have discovered that microglia, specialized immune cells in the brain, play a key role in clearing dead material after brain injury. The study, which will be published June 25 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, reveals that microglia gobble up the remnants of injured neurons, which could prevent the damage from spreading to neighboring neurons and causing more extensive neurodegeneration.

Released:
19-Jun-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 696532

Children with Existing Allergies Should Be Screened for an Emerging, Severe Chronic Food Allergy

Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Children with known skin, food and respiratory allergies should be screened for an emerging food allergy called eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), a painful inflammation of the esophagus. Pediatric allergists who analyzed a very large group of children say that EoE is a later component of the “allergic march”-- in which many children successively develop a series of allergies.

Released:
25-Jun-2018 8:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 696396

Spectroscopic THz Sensors: the new technology for monitoring and detecting atmospheric pollutants.

Bakman Technologies

Bakman Technologies demonstrates the first truly portable frequency domain THz spectrometer capable of measuring Doppler-limited transitions in gas mixtures.

Released:
24-Jun-2018 6:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696554

Penn Study Reveals New Therapeutic Target for Slowing the Spread of Flu Virus

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Influenza A hijacks host proteins for viral RNA splicing and blocking these interactions caused replication of the virus to slow, which could point to novel strategies for antiviral therapies.

Released:
22-Jun-2018 3:40 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696216

Scientists Discover How Antiviral Gene Works

Albert Einstein College of Medicine

It’s been known for years that humans and other mammals possess an antiviral gene called RSAD2 that prevents a remarkable range of viruses from multiplying. Now, researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, part of Montefiore, have discovered the secret to the gene’s success: The enzyme it codes for generates a compound that stops viruses from replicating. The newly discovered compound, described in today’s online edition of Nature, offers a novel approach for attacking many disease-causing viruses.

Released:
22-Jun-2018 11:30 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    22-Jun-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 696332

Overdose Risk Quintuples with Opioid and Benzodiazepine Use

Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

In the first 90 days of concurrent opioid and benzodiazepine use, the risk of opioid-related overdose increases five-fold compared to opioid-only use among Medicare recipients, according to a new study from the University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy.

Released:
20-Jun-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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