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Article ID: 695563

Major land restoration study to identify "foundation species" best suited for seed production

Northern Arizona University

As climate change brings more severe, more frequent wildfires and droughts throughout the western United States, land managers are increasingly challenged to find the best restoration approaches—and the right kinds of seeds to plant for successful outcomes. At the same time, pollinators such as bees, birds and butterflies are in decline, which poses a major threat to both conservation and agriculture. A cross-disciplinary team of NAU ecologists recently received a five-year, $935,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to study which plants are most fit for restoring damaged lands and capable of supporting diverse pollinator communities.

Released:
4-Jun-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695509

‘Avoidance Behavior’ Helps Species Survive on Land and Sea

University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences

In a new article published in the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, Donald Behringer and one of his co-authors, post-doctoral researcher Jamie Bojko, both of the UF Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, point out many ways organisms try to escape diseases.

Released:
4-Jun-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 695348

How do soil microbes influence nutrient availability?

Soil Science Society of America (SSSA)

There are hundreds of thousands—if not millions—of organisms in just a handful of soil. The Soil Science Society of America (SSSA) June 1 Soils Matter blog explains the important role of soil microbes in freeing up soil nutrients for plants.

Released:
1-Jun-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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Agriculture, Plants

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Article ID: 695444

A Call for Doctors to Lead the Charge for Antibiotic-Free Foods

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Released:
1-Jun-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 695368

Plant scientists use big data to map stress responses in corn

Iowa State University

Recently published research from Iowa State University plant scientists maps the stress response detected by the endoplasmic reticulum, an organelle in cells of corn seedlings. The study shows how cells transition from adaptation to death when faced with persistent stress and could help plant breeders develop stress-resistant crop varieties.

Released:
31-May-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 695295

UF Survey: Homeowners Want to Keep Their Lawns Lush and Conserve Water

University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences

They also want a landscape with pollinators, one that helps preserve the environment and one on which they can lie in a hammock for peace of mind, said Laura Warner, a UF assistant professor of agricultural education and communication.

Released:
30-May-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 695251

Radish Cover Crop Traps Nitrogen; Mystery Follows

American Society of Agronomy (ASA), Crop Science Society of America (CSSA), Soil Science Society of America (SSSA)

New research supports the use of radish as a cover crop as a trap crop for fall nitrogen. However, what happens to that nitrogen afterward remains unknown.

Released:
30-May-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 695267

Bees Adjust to Seasons with Nutrients in Flowers and ‘Dirty Water’

Tufts University

Researchers discovered that honey bees alter their diet by the season. A spike in calcium consumption in the fall, and high intake of potassium, help prepare the bees for colder months when they likely need those minerals to generate warmth. Limitations in nutrient availability can have implications for the health of both managed and wild colonies.

Released:
29-May-2018 5:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695225

A new insight into the beetle-fungus symbiosis

Bowling Green State University

A Bowling Green State University microbiology team played an important role in a scientific discovery about alcohol benefitting fungus farming in beetles. The beetle research, headed by an entomologist Christopher Ranger of USDA-ARS, discovered that alcohol, specifically ethanol, is important for the beetles’ food production, and part of the logic for their attraction to alcohol.

Released:
29-May-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695150

Expert Available for Comment on Issues Regarding Modern Slavery and Human Trafficking

Arizona State University (ASU)

Released:
29-May-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Law and Public Policy


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