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Article ID: 697080

In Patients with Heart Failure, Anxiety and Depression Linked to Worse Outcomes

Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

Symptoms of depression and anxiety are present in about one-third of patients with heart failure – and these patients are at higher risk of progressive heart disease and other adverse outcomes, according to a review and update in the July/August issue of Harvard Review of Psychiatry. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Released:
6-Jul-2018 9:30 AM EDT
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Article ID: 697051

An Aggressor Is Not Necessarily a Bully – and the Distinction Matters

University at Buffalo

There is a difference between general aggressive behavior and bullying. They are not the same thing, according to the findings of a new paper by a University at Buffalo psychologist who is among the country’s leading authorities on aggression, bullying and peer victimization. “It’s important for us to realize this distinction, in part because every aggressive behavior we see is not bullying,” says Jamie Ostrov, lead author of the forthcoming paper to be published in a special issue of the Journal of Child and Family Studies.

Released:
5-Jul-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 697000

Loneliness Found to Be High in Public Senior Housing Communities

Washington University in St. Louis

Older adults living in public senior housing communities experience a large degree of loneliness, finds a new study from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis.Nevertheless, senior housing communities may be ideal locations for reducing that loneliness, the study finds.“There are many studies on loneliness among community-dwelling older adults; however, there is limited research examining the extent and correlates of loneliness among older adults who reside in senior housing communities,” wrote Harry Chatters Taylor, doctoral student at the Brown School and lead author of “Loneliness in Senior Housing Communities,” published in the Journal of Gerontological Social Work.

Released:
3-Jul-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 696992

Scientists Identify Mechanism That May Explain Why Males Are More at Risk Than Females For Neurodevelopmental Disorders

University of Maryland School of Medicine

Sex plays a role in hypertension, diabetes, arthritis – and in many neurological and psychiatric disorders. To better understand the molecular underpinnings of this disparity, Tracy Bale of the University of Maryland School of Medicine, along with several colleagues, focused on a molecule that plays a key role in placental health. In a study of mice, they found that the molecule, O-linked N-acetylglucosamine transferase (OGT) works by establishing sex-specific patterns of gene expression.

Released:
3-Jul-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696978

Can Parents of Juvenile Offenders Still Dream?

Michigan State University

Mothers want the best for their sons, but what happens to a mother’s hopes and dreams when her son is charged as a juvenile offender? A new study from Michigan State University published in the Journal of Research on Adolescence reveals that mothers don’t lose hope for their sons’ futures and potential – even if they are arrested as a minor.

Released:
3-Jul-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 696977

Creighton psychological science professor's work with rats gives insight into treatment for human drug addiction

Creighton University

Through looking at individual difference models in laboratory rat populations, Creighton University psychological science professor Dustin Stairs, PhD, and his team of undergraduate researchers are making inroads into the neuroscience of addiction and the power of social settings to help overcome a drug habit.

Released:
3-Jul-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 696960

The Gender Bias of Names: Surnames Standing Solo Gives Men Advantage

Cornell University

In new research, Cornell University psychologists find that study participants, on average, were more than twice as likely to call male professionals – even fictional ones – by their last name only, compared to equivalent female professionals. This example of gender bias, say researchers, may be contributing to gender inequality.

Released:
2-Jul-2018 5:05 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 696922

​3 Research-Based Ways to Maximize the Fun of Leisure Activities

Ohio State University

Everyone’s so busy these days that it is easy to think you need to schedule time to have fun. But be careful about how you do that, said Selin Malkoc, a time management expert at The Ohio State University’s Fisher College of Business. Research shows that scheduling can undermine enjoyment if it is not done right,

Released:
2-Jul-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 696917

Can Parenting Skills Prevent Childhood Obesity?

Arizona State University (ASU)

Researchers in Arizona State University’s Department of Psychology received a five-year grant for just under $2.5 million from the USDA to implement an intervention program that targets childhood obesity in a novel way: by teaching parenting skills.

Released:
2-Jul-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 696906

Prospective Teachers More Likely to View Black Faces Than White Faces as Angry

North Carolina State University

A preliminary study of prospective teachers finds that they are more likely to view the face of Black adults as angry compared to the faces of White adults. Similarly, the study participants viewed the behavior of Black children as more hostile than the behavior of White children.

Released:
2-Jul-2018 8:05 AM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences


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