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  • Embargo expired:
    9-Jul-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 697041

Genome Editing Reduces Cholesterol in Large Animal Model, Laying the Groundwork for In-Human Trials

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Using genome editing to inactivate a protein called PCSK9 effectively reduces cholesterol levels in rhesus macaques, the first demonstration of a clinically relevant reduction of gene expression in a large animal model using genome editing. This finding could lead to a possible new approach for treating heart disease patients who do not tolerate PCSK9 inhibitors—drugs that are commonly used to combat high cholesterol.

Released:
5-Jul-2018 1:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 697080

In Patients with Heart Failure, Anxiety and Depression Linked to Worse Outcomes

Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

Symptoms of depression and anxiety are present in about one-third of patients with heart failure – and these patients are at higher risk of progressive heart disease and other adverse outcomes, according to a review and update in the July/August issue of Harvard Review of Psychiatry. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Released:
6-Jul-2018 9:30 AM EDT
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Article ID: 697064

Key Discovery Made in Genetic Make-Up of Heart Condition Linked to Sudden Cardiac Death

University Health Network (UHN)

A new study published in Circulation, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Heart Association and led by a cardiologist at the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre at Toronto General Hospital has found evidence that only one of the 21 genes normally associated with Brugada Syndrome is a definitive cause of the condition.

Released:
6-Jul-2018 8:20 AM EDT
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Article ID: 697044

The Rising Price of Medicare Part D’s 10 Most Costly Medications

University of California San Diego Health

Researchers at Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences at University of California San Diego have found that the cost for the 10 “highest spend” medications in Medicare Part D — the U.S. federal government’s primary prescription drug benefit for older citizens — rose almost one-third between 2011 and 2015, even as the number of persons using these drugs dropped by the same amount.

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5-Jul-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 697007

Smidt Heart Institute Patient is First in U.S. to Receive New Heart Valve Device

Cedars-Sinai

A Smidt Heart Institute patient is the first in the country to receive a new device to fix a leaky heart valve. The patient, Sheldon Kardener, MD, received the device July 1 during a 30-minute minimally invasive procedure in Cedars-Sinai’s Cardiac Catheterization Lab as a treatment for mitral valve regurgitation. The procedure was performed by Saibal Kar, MD, widely regarded as one of the foremost experts in mitral valve repair. Kardener was discharged and returned home Monday morning.

Released:
3-Jul-2018 3:45 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696935

Mount Sinai Leaders Discuss the Future of Medicine at the 2018 Aspen Ideas Festival

Mount Sinai Health System

Experts provide on-site complimentary skin cancer and healthy heart screenings

Released:
2-Jul-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696929

Algorithm Identifies Hypertensive Patients Who Will Benefit Most From More Intensive Treatment

UT Southwestern Medical Center

Using data from large clinical trials, UT Southwestern researchers developed a way to predict which patients will benefit most from aggressive high blood pressure treatment.

Released:
2-Jul-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696849

For dialysis patients with AFib, a newer blood thinner may provide a safer option

Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A new study finds a newer blood thinner may be a safer choice for reducing stroke risk in those who have both end-stage kidney disease and atrial fibrillation.

Released:
28-Jun-2018 6:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696839

BIDMC Research Brief Digest: June 2018

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

A monthly roundup of research briefs showcasing recent scientific advances led by Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center faculty.

Released:
28-Jun-2018 5:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696819

Computational Models Provide Novel Genetic Insights Into Atherosclerosis

Mount Sinai Health System

Researchers find gene in artery wall activated by lipids associated with coronary artery disease

Released:
28-Jun-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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