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Article ID: 697181

Research Update: Cellular “Garbage Disposal” Has Another Job

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins researchers have found that the cellular “garbage disposal,” known to scientists as proteasomes, may not only be responsible for the removal of cellular waste, but actually work on some of the most important proteins to neuronal development.

Released:
10-Jul-2018 8:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 697180

Can Fasting Improve MS Symptoms?

Washington University in St. Louis

People with multiple sclerosis (MS) can find an abundance of conflicting advice suggesting that special diets will ease their symptoms. But the evidence is scanty. Laura Piccio, MD, an associate professor of neurology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has launched a trial to evaluate whether drastically cutting calories twice a week can change the body’s immune environment and the gut microbiome, and potentially change the course of the disease.

Released:
9-Jul-2018 3:30 PM EDT
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Article ID: 697163

Biosensor Chip Detects Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Wirelessly and with Higher Sensitivity

University of California San Diego

A team led by the University of California San Diego has developed a chip that can detect a type of genetic mutation known as a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and wirelessly send the results in real time to an electronic device. The chip is at least 1,000 times more sensitive at detecting an SNP than current technology. The advance could lead to cheaper, faster and portable biosensors for early detection of genetic markers for diseases such as cancer.

Released:
9-Jul-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 697148

Pucker Up, Baby! Lips Take Center Stage in Infants’ Brains, Study Says

University of Washington

Researchers used brain imaging to gauge how the hand, foot and lips are represented in the brains of 2-month-olds – a much younger age than has been studied previously. It is believed to be the first to reveal the greater neurological activity associated with the lips than with other body parts represented in the infant brain. It also indicates how soon infants’ brains begin to make sense of their bodies, a first step toward other developmental milestones.

Released:
9-Jul-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

  • Embargo expired:
    9-Jul-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 697091

Study Finds Mutation Driving Deadlier Brain Tumors and Potential Therapy to Stop It

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

A poorly understood mutation in the brain cancer glioblastoma (GBM) is now being implicated for the first time as the driver of rare but deadlier cases of the disease, a team of researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research reported this week in Cancer Cell.

Released:
6-Jul-2018 11:30 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    6-Jul-2018 6:35 PM EDT

Article ID: 697061

Preventative HIV Vaccine Candidate Triggers Desired Immune Responses in Humans and Monkeys, and Protects Monkeys from Infection

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

In a new study, published July 6 in The Lancet, a team of researchers led by Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center's Dan H. Barouch, MD, PhD, in collaboration with Janssen Vaccines & Prevention and other partners, evaluated a series of preventative HIV vaccine regimens in uninfected human volunteers in five countries. In a similarly designed study, Barouch and colleagues tested the same vaccine for its ability to protect rhesus monkeys challenged with an HIV-like virus from infection. The findings showed the vaccines induced robust and comparable immune responses in humans and monkeys and protected monkeys against acquisition of infection.

Released:
5-Jul-2018 4:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 697102

Savory Foods May Promote Healthy Eating Through Effects on the Brain

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center have found that consuming a broth rich in umami—or savory taste—can cause subtle changes in the brain that promote healthy eating behaviors and food choices, especially in women at risk of obesity.

Released:
6-Jul-2018 3:30 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    6-Jul-2018 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 696790

Breast Cancer Growth Signals Are Enhanced by a Protein Outside Cells

The Rockefeller University Press

New research uncovers how a sticky protein called fibronectin promotes the activity of estrogen in breast cancer cells. The study, “Fibronectin rescues estrogen receptor α from lysosomal degradation in breast cancer cells,” will be published July 6 in the Journal of Cell Biology (JCB).

Released:
28-Jun-2018 12:00 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    6-Jul-2018 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 696896

Smart Bandages Designed to Monitor and Tailor Treatment for Chronic Wounds

Tufts University

A “smart” bandage is designed to monitor the condition of chronic wounds and deliver drug treatments to improve chances of healing. While the bandages remain to be assessed in a clinical context, the research is aimed at transforming bandaging from a passive to an active treatment paradigm.

Released:
29-Jun-2018 4:15 PM EDT
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Article ID: 697017

Swallowed Sensor Sends Signal if You’re Sick

National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

NIBIB-funded researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have created an ingestible sensor to non-invasively monitor indicators of disease in the stomach and intestines.

Released:
5-Jul-2018 9:25 AM EDT
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