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  • Embargo expired:
    9-Jul-2018 12:05 AM EDT

Article ID: 697074

Parents Who Had Severe Trauma, Stresses in Childhood More Likely to Have Kids with Behavioral Health Problems

University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

A new study finds that severe childhood trauma and stresses early in parents' lives are linked to higher rates of behavioral health problems in their own children.

Released:
6-Jul-2018 12:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    9-Jul-2018 12:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 696996

A Lifetime Sentence: Incarceration of Parents Impacts Health of Their Children into Adulthood

Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

Young adults who had parents incarcerated during childhood do not receive timely healthcare and have more unhealthy behaviors, Lurie Children’s researchers find

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3-Jul-2018 2:50 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 697102

Savory Foods May Promote Healthy Eating Through Effects on the Brain

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center have found that consuming a broth rich in umami—or savory taste—can cause subtle changes in the brain that promote healthy eating behaviors and food choices, especially in women at risk of obesity.

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6-Jul-2018 3:30 PM EDT
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Article ID: 697080

In Patients with Heart Failure, Anxiety and Depression Linked to Worse Outcomes

Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

Symptoms of depression and anxiety are present in about one-third of patients with heart failure – and these patients are at higher risk of progressive heart disease and other adverse outcomes, according to a review and update in the July/August issue of Harvard Review of Psychiatry. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

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6-Jul-2018 9:30 AM EDT
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Article ID: 697020

Obesity and Overweight Linked to Long-Term Health Problems after Traumatic Brain Injury

Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

Especially at longer follow-up times, overweight and obesity are associated with chronic disease risks for survivors of moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), reports a study in the July/August issue of the Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation (JHTR). The official journal of the Brain Injury Association of America, JHTR is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Released:
6-Jul-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 697051

An Aggressor Is Not Necessarily a Bully – and the Distinction Matters

University at Buffalo

There is a difference between general aggressive behavior and bullying. They are not the same thing, according to the findings of a new paper by a University at Buffalo psychologist who is among the country’s leading authorities on aggression, bullying and peer victimization. “It’s important for us to realize this distinction, in part because every aggressive behavior we see is not bullying,” says Jamie Ostrov, lead author of the forthcoming paper to be published in a special issue of the Journal of Child and Family Studies.

Released:
5-Jul-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 697046

How Not to Get Bored with the Same Old Things

Ohio State University

Robert Smith, assistant professor of marketing in the Fisher College of Business at The Ohio State University, talks about the concepts of satiation and entitativity, and how we learn about ourselves through targeted advertising.

Released:
5-Jul-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

  • Embargo expired:
    5-Jul-2018 10:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 696905

People with Alcohol Problems Tend to Wrongly Identify Emotional Faces as Hostile

Research Society on Alcoholism

The ability to recognize emotion in others’ facial expressions is an important social skill for interpersonal relationships, work interactions, and family life. Alcohol use disorders (AUDs) are linked to a number of deficits in reasoning and emotional functions, including difficulty in identifying emotional facial expressions. This study examined the emotion-recognition abilities of individuals with an AUD and whether the expected deficits were associated with drinking or anxious and depressive symptoms.

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2-Jul-2018 7:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 697000

Loneliness Found to Be High in Public Senior Housing Communities

Washington University in St. Louis

Older adults living in public senior housing communities experience a large degree of loneliness, finds a new study from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis.Nevertheless, senior housing communities may be ideal locations for reducing that loneliness, the study finds.“There are many studies on loneliness among community-dwelling older adults; however, there is limited research examining the extent and correlates of loneliness among older adults who reside in senior housing communities,” wrote Harry Chatters Taylor, doctoral student at the Brown School and lead author of “Loneliness in Senior Housing Communities,” published in the Journal of Gerontological Social Work.

Released:
3-Jul-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 696992

Scientists Identify Mechanism That May Explain Why Males Are More at Risk Than Females For Neurodevelopmental Disorders

University of Maryland School of Medicine

Sex plays a role in hypertension, diabetes, arthritis – and in many neurological and psychiatric disorders. To better understand the molecular underpinnings of this disparity, Tracy Bale of the University of Maryland School of Medicine, along with several colleagues, focused on a molecule that plays a key role in placental health. In a study of mice, they found that the molecule, O-linked N-acetylglucosamine transferase (OGT) works by establishing sex-specific patterns of gene expression.

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3-Jul-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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