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Article ID: 697301

Intimate Partner Violence Doesn’t End with the Relationship

University at Buffalo

Violence that occurs between intimate partners does not end with the relationship’s conclusion, yet few resources exist to help survivors move beyond the betrayal of abusive relationships in order to begin new, healthy relationships. The effects of intimate partner violence (IPV) are profound, painfully enduring and should command as much attention as providing victims with the help necessary to leave violent relationships, according to a new study by a University at Buffalo social work researcher.

Released:
11-Jul-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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    11-Jul-2018 10:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 697083

Reminder Emails after a Computer-based Intervention Help Some College Students Reduce Their Drinking

Research Society on Alcoholism

College students entering adulthood often drink too much. Negative consequences can include missed classes, poor grades, a wide array of injuries, and even assault. Many academic institutions have addressed this problem by offering computer-delivered interventions (CDIs) for rapid and wide dissemination to students. Although effective in the short term, CDIs are not as helpful longer-term as face-to-face interventions. However, face-to-face interventions are typically only used with students who receive alcohol sanctions, whereas CDIs can be used with large groups (such as student athletes, or all incoming students) and are more cost-effective. This study examined the usefulness of “boosters” – personalized emails sent to post-CDI participants– for maintaining decreased drinking.

Released:
6-Jul-2018 9:35 AM EDT
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Article ID: 697275

Reaching for Tissues at the Symphony? It’s Probably Solo Time

Ohio State University

A new study helps illuminate the ways in which a composer might intentionally impart sadness into the lines of an orchestral piece. Here’s a clue: It doesn’t take much. The solo player proves to be an important element of the kind of songs that tighten our throats and leave us searching for a tissue mid-performance, found a study led by Niels Chr. Hansen of The Ohio State University.

Released:
11-Jul-2018 9:40 AM EDT
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Arts and Humanities

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Article ID: 697238

Less Is More: Researchers Find Lower Heart Rate Variability in Children Is Protective Against Long-Term Effects of Maternal Postpartum Depression

Arizona State University (ASU)

A relatively simple, noninvasive biological test conducted shortly after birth could help researchers identify which children are most vulnerable to the effects of maternal postpartum depression.

Released:
10-Jul-2018 1:20 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 697227

National Network of Indian Depression Centers Partners with U.S. Depression Centers Network

Loyola University Health System

The National Network of Depression Centers (NNDC) has joined forces with the National Network of Depression Centers India (NNDC– I) to help people who suffer from depression, bipolar disorder and other mood disorders in India.

Released:
10-Jul-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 697237

How Women Define Their Sexual Histories Affects How They Are Influenced by Them, Study

University of Texas at Austin (UT Austin)

While it’s estimated that more than a third of women have had nonconsensual sexual experiences in their lifetime, the way they define those experiences may influence their sexual wellbeing, according to psychology researchers at The University of Texas at Austin.

Released:
10-Jul-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 697214

That Sound Makes Me Dizzy

University of Utah

Researchers from the University of Utah have discovered why certain people experience dizziness when they hear a particular sound, such as a musical tone. For patients with semicircular canal dehiscence, certain acoustic tones cause the inner ear fluid to pump which sends an incorrect signal to the brain and creates dizziness.

Released:
10-Jul-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

  • Embargo expired:
    10-Jul-2018 10:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 697022

Alcoholics Continue to Have Problems with Emotional Communication Despite Abstinence

Research Society on Alcoholism

An important part of communication is non-verbal. Most people who engage in social interactions recognize a range of emotional states reflected in other people’s facial expressions, body postures, and/or tone of voice. Alcoholism has been linked to difficulties in perceiving and processing emotions expressed in these non-verbal cues. This study examined whether these difficulties persist after long-term abstinence from alcohol.

Released:
5-Jul-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    10-Jul-2018 10:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 697206

ACSM and Wellcoaches Expand Partnership to Deliver Industry-leading Coaching & Behavior Change Programs

American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM)

The American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) and Wellcoaches Corporation (Wellcoaches) will expand their partnership to deliver two cobranded programs to those working in the fitness and wellness professions.

Released:
10-Jul-2018 9:50 AM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 697148

Pucker Up, Baby! Lips Take Center Stage in Infants’ Brains, Study Says

University of Washington

Researchers used brain imaging to gauge how the hand, foot and lips are represented in the brains of 2-month-olds – a much younger age than has been studied previously. It is believed to be the first to reveal the greater neurological activity associated with the lips than with other body parts represented in the infant brain. It also indicates how soon infants’ brains begin to make sense of their bodies, a first step toward other developmental milestones.

Released:
9-Jul-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences


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