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  • Embargo expired:
    20-Jul-2018 5:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 697636

Drug Now in Clinical Trials for Parkinson’s Strengthens Heart Contractions in Animals

Johns Hopkins Medicine

A drug currently in clinical trials for treating symptoms of Parkinson’s disease may someday have value for treating heart failure, according to results of early animal studies by Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers.

Released:
19-Jul-2018 10:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 697659

Diabetes during Pregnancy May Increase Baby’s Heart Disease Risk

American Physiological Society (APS)

Gestational diabetes may increase the risk of blood vessel dysfunction and heart disease in offspring by altering a smooth muscle protein responsible for blood vessel network formation. Understanding of the protein’s function in fetal cells may improve early detection of disease in children. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Cell Physiology.

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19-Jul-2018 3:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 697669

Memory Foam for Vascular Treatment Receives FDA Clearance

National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

Shape Memory Medical recently announced FDA clearance for U.S. marketing of their IMPEDE Embolization Plug, a technology funded by NIBIB and created to block irregular blood vessels.

Released:
19-Jul-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    19-Jul-2018 5:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 697483

‘Good Cholesterol’ May Not Always be Good for Postmenopausal Women

Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

Postmenopausal factors may have an impact on the heart-protective qualities of high-density lipoproteins (HDL) – also known as ‘good cholesterol.’ The findings bring into question the current use of total HDL cholesterol to predict heart disease risk.

Released:
17-Jul-2018 10:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    19-Jul-2018 12:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 697491

Earlier Intervention for Mitral Valve Disease May Lead to Improved Outcomes

The Society of Thoracic Surgeons

The number of patients undergoing mitral valve operations are at an all-time high, and new research suggests that many patients don’t undergo surgical intervention until it’s too late to completely reverse damage caused by mitral valve disease.

Released:
17-Jul-2018 11:25 AM EDT
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Article ID: 697540

BBQ Breakdown: How Summertime Staples Can Impact Your Health

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

With the 4th of July in the rearview mirror and Labor Day coming down the pike, barbecue season is in full swing. Though some may prefer meatless options like veggie burgers or grilled portabellas, summertime staples like hot dogs and hamburgers still occupy a good bit of that paper plate real estate. In fact, July has been named National Hot Dog Month by the National Hot Dog and Sausage Council and today, July 18, marks this year’s National Hot Dog Day. While these classics have been the center piece of many American BBQs for decades, the harsh reality is that they remain some of the unhealthiest choices. Despite these known risks coming from clinicians, and data from organizations such as the World Health Organizations (WHO), which reported in 2015 that processed meat was linked to an increase in cancer risk, these items are not likely to disappear from party menus. So while moderation is king, we asked Penn experts in nutrition to dissect some typical barbecue fare to show just how

Released:
18-Jul-2018 11:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 697575

Heart Attack Risk on the Rise for Pregnant Women and Death Rate Remains High

NYU Langone Health

NYU Langone study serves as an important reminder of how stressful pregnancy can be on the female body and heart, causing a lot of physiological changes, and potentially unmasking risk factors that can lead to heart attack.

Released:
18-Jul-2018 12:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 697543

$1.54 Million NIH Grant to Wayne State to Identify Ways to Improve Cardiac Function in Heart Failure

Wayne State University Division of Research

With the help of a $1.54 million grant from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health, a research team from Wayne State University will establish a targeted approach to sustain cardiac function during an energetic crisis and heart failure.

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17-Jul-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    17-Jul-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 697278

High Vinculin Levels Help Keep Aging Fruit Fly Hearts Young

American Institute of Physics (AIP)

In the heart, aging can disrupt the protein network within muscle cells that move blood around the body. However, a new discovery in how heart muscles maintain their shape in fruit flies sheds light on the crucial relationship between cardiac function, metabolism, and longevity. Researchers have discovered that maintaining high levels of the protein vinculin confers health benefits to fruit flies. Their work, published in APL Bioengineering, shows that fruit flies bred to produce 50 percent more vinculin enjoyed better cardiovascular health and lived a third of their average life span longer.

Released:
11-Jul-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 697477

CRF Skirball Center for Innovation Partners with Siemens Healthineers to Advance Imaging Capabilities for Structural Heart Disease Research

Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF)

The Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) is pleased to announce that its premier translational research facility, the CRF Skirball Center for Innovation (SCI), is partnering with Siemens Healthineers to advance their imaging capabilities for structural heart disease research. SCI is dedicated to guiding early ideas and innovations in cardiology through comprehensive preclinical research programs to introduce practical clinical therapies to patients. As part of this collaboration, SCI will now offer a Siemens Healthineers SOMATOM Definition Flash CT scanner, which will help expand SCI’s research capabilities and maximize efficiencies for its sponsors.

Released:
16-Jul-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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