Press "esc" to clear
Go to Advanced Search

Showing results

110 of 304
Embargo will expire:
19-Jul-2018 11:00 AM EDT
Released to reporters:
12-Jul-2018 4:45 PM EDT

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 19-Jul-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 697372

Novel Therapy Delays Muscle Atrophy in Lou Gehrig’s Disease Model

Case Western Reserve University

Supplementing a single protein found in the spinal cord could help prevent symptoms of Lou Gehrig’s disease, according to a new study out of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. Researchers found high levels of the protein—called mitofusion 2 or Mfn2—prevented nerve degeneration, muscle atrophy, and paralysis in a mouse model of the disease. Since Mfn2 is often depleted during Lou Gehrig’s, the new study suggests supplementing it could be a novel therapeutic approach for the disease.

Released:
12-Jul-2018 1:05 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment
Clocks_760_507.jpg

Article ID: 697360

VIP Neurons Hold Master Key to Jet Lag Response

Washington University in St. Louis

Travel by airplane has opened the door to experiencing different cultures and exploring natural wonders. That is, if you can get past the jet lag. But what if you could take control of the brain's daily timing system? Biologists at Washington University in St. Louis unlocked a cure for jet lag in mice by activating a small subset of the neurons involved in setting daily rhythms, as reported in a July 12 advance online publication of Neuron.

Released:
12-Jul-2018 12:05 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment
cGAS.gif
  • Embargo expired:
    12-Jul-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 697196

Guardian of the Cell

Harvard Medical School

Scientists have defined the structure and key features of a human immune-surveillance protein that guards against cancer and bacterial and viral infections The identification of two human-specific variations in the protein closes a critical knowledge gap in immunology and cancer biology The variations explain why the human protein is more precise and more selective than mammalian forms of the protein and why it targets certain types of DNA but ignores others The findings can inform the design of more precisely targeted immune therapies against cancer and a range of immune-mediated diseases

Released:
9-Jul-2018 5:45 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment
Illustration.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    12-Jul-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 697253

Researchers Discover Gene That Controls Bone-to-Fat Ratio in Bone Marrow

University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

UCLA researchers have found that the PGC-1α gene, previously known to control human metabolism, also controls the equilibrium of bone and fat in bone marrow and also how an adult stem cell expresses its final cell type. The findings could lead to a better understanding of the disruption of bone-to-fat ratio in bone marrow and its health consequences, and point to the gene as a therapeutic target in the treatment of osteoporosis and skeletal aging.

Released:
10-Jul-2018 3:00 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment
07-10-18-Hui-tumor-brake-1280.jpg

Article ID: 697250

UC San Diego Biologists Discover Process That Neutralizes Tumors

University of California San Diego

Researchers discovered an unexpected twist in the battle versus tumors. Researchers have found that some tumor cells display not only a weapon, but also a brake, essentially becoming a neutralizing function. The unexpected mechanism could help determine whether a cancer patient will respond to immunotherapy.

Released:
10-Jul-2018 3:05 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment
Piccio-0014_forweb.jpg

Article ID: 697180

Can Fasting Improve MS Symptoms?

Washington University in St. Louis

People with multiple sclerosis (MS) can find an abundance of conflicting advice suggesting that special diets will ease their symptoms. But the evidence is scanty. Laura Piccio, MD, an associate professor of neurology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has launched a trial to evaluate whether drastically cutting calories twice a week can change the body’s immune environment and the gut microbiome, and potentially change the course of the disease.

Released:
9-Jul-2018 3:30 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment

Article ID: 697018

Revving Up Innate Control of Viral Infection Requires a Three-Cell Ignition

Thomas Jefferson University

The innate NK-cell response requires a rather carefully choreographed interaction of three cell types.

Released:
5-Jul-2018 9:45 AM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment
DeBerardinis.jpg

Article ID: 696975

Researchers Discover New Vulnerability in Deadly Form of Lung Cancer

UT Southwestern Medical Center

Researchers at the Children’s Medical Center Research Institute at UT Southwestern (CRI) have discovered a new metabolic vulnerability in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) that can be targeted by existing drug therapies.

Released:
3-Jul-2018 11:05 AM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment
24601589811_f865075184_o.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    3-Jul-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 696703

How Targeting Metabolism Can Defeat Cancer Stem Cells

Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Researchers have found that cancer stem cells exist in more than one state and can change form, sliding back and forth between a dormant state and a rapidly growing state. The cell's metabolism controls this change, suggesting a possible way in to attack the stem cells.

Released:
27-Jun-2018 9:35 AM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment

Showing results

110 of 304





Chat now!