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  • Embargo expired:
    17-May-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 694639

The Right Moves

Harvard Medical School

New research in mice reveals how specialized neurons allow the brain to construct sequences of movements. Damage to these neurons disrupts the ability to correctly string together movements into desired actions. The findings may inform the study and eventual treatment of movement disorders such as Parkinson’s and Huntington’s.

Released:
15-May-2018 4:15 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    15-May-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 694324

Taming Random Gene Changes As Our Bodies Start to Form

Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

Scientists exploring how to tame random gene fluctuations as the embryos that become our bodies start to form have identified a control switch in the vertebrate segmentation clock of developing zebrafish. The researchers report in Cell Reports their findings could uncover methods for modulating genetic signals to prevent birth defects or cancers rooted at the earliest stages of development.

Released:
10-May-2018 8:30 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    10-May-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 694232

Study Reveals How the Germ Behind Flesh-Eating Disease Hijacks Neurons to Avoid Immune Destruction and Ensure Its Own Survival

Harvard Medical School

Although rare, flesh-eating disease is challenging to diagnose promptly and can rapidly become fatal. A study conducted in mice reveals that neurons play key role in the development of flesh-eating disease. The findings show that a bacterium that causes flesh-eating disease hijacks the normal crosstalk between nervous and immune systems to avoid immune destruction, thus ensuring its own survival. Two approaches prevent infections, halt disease progression in mice.

Released:
8-May-2018 4:00 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    10-May-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 694267

Microbes From Marine Volcanic Vents Reveal How Humans Adjusted to a Changing Atmosphere

Van Andel Research Institute

The findings, published today in Cell by scientists at Van Andel Research Institute (VARI), University of Georgia (UGA) and Washington State University, detail the structure of MBH, a molecular complex involved in microbial respiration. The near-atomic resolution images are the first ever of MBH and show that its structure is remarkably similar to its counterpart in humans, Complex I.

Released:
9-May-2018 12:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694202

How Epigenetic Regulation of the Hoxb Gene Cluster Maintains Normal Blood-forming Stem Cells and Inhibits Leukemia

Stowers Institute for Medical Research

New research from the Stowers Institute for Medical Research reveals that a DNA regulatory element within the Hoxb cluster globally mediates signals to the majority of Hoxb genes to control their expression in blood-forming stem cells.

Released:
8-May-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    8-May-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 693869

Tissue Engineered Human Pancreas Cells Successfully Treat Diabetic Mice

Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

Researchers tissue-engineered human pancreatic islets in a laboratory that develop a circulatory system, secrete hormones like insulin and successfully treat sudden-onset type 1 diabetes in transplanted mice. In a study published by Cell Reports, the scientists use a new bioengineering process they developed called a self-condensation cell culture. The technology helps nudge medical science closer to one day growing human organ tissues from a person’s own cells for regenerative therapy

Released:
2-May-2018 11:30 AM EDT
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Article ID: 694148

Uncovering a Hidden Protein “Tail” that Puts the Brakes on Cell Signaling

Georgia Institute of Technology

Using an informatics tool that identifies “hotspots” of post-translational modification (PTM) activity on proteins, researchers have found a previously-unknown mechanism that puts the brakes on an important cell signaling process involving the G proteins found in most living organisms.

Released:
7-May-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 693805

Scientists Identify 2 Hormones That Burn Fat Faster, Prevent and Reverse Diabetes in Mice

University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

UCLA geneticists have created a technique to hunt for hormones that influence how organs and tissues communicate with each other. The method enabled them to find naturally occurring molecules that play major roles in Type 2 diabetes, obesity and cardiovascular disease.

Released:
1-May-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 693794

Persistence Pays Off in Discovery That Could Lead to Improved Treatment and Survivability of Patients with Brain Tumors

Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah

Gliomas are the most common type of central nervous system cancer but how these tumors develop is not fully understood. Sheri Holmen, PhD a researcher at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) and professor of surgery at the University of Utah just published the results of her research on gliomas in Cell Reports. The work is focused on a mutated gene that is a critical piece of the puzzle for glioma development, according to Holmen’s work.

Released:
1-May-2018 11:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    1-May-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 693460

Scientists Map Key Brain-to-Spinal Cord Nerve Connections for Voluntary Movement

Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

Researchers mapped critical brain-to-spinal cord nerve connections that drive voluntary movement in forelimbs, a development that scientists say allows them to start looking for specific repair strategies. The study is an important step toward one day rehabilitating motor circuits to help motor function recover after an injury or disease damages the central nervous system, the scientists report in Cell Reports.

Released:
25-Apr-2018 1:00 PM EDT
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