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  • Embargo expired:
    16-Jul-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 697352

Self-Control and Obesity: Gender Matters in Children

Ohio State University

A toddler’s self-regulation – the ability to change behavior in different social situations – may predict whether he or she will be obese come kindergarten, but the connection appears to be much different for girls than for boys.

Released:
12-Jul-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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18-Jul-2018 11:00 AM EDT
Released to reporters:
16-Jul-2018 9:00 AM EDT

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 18-Jul-2018 11:00 AM EDT

  • Embargo expired:
    12-Jul-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 697203

CHOP Researchers Develop Highly Specific, Easy-to-Implement Predictive Screening Tool for Retinopathy in Premature Infants

Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

A multi-hospital collaboration led by researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) has found a simple method of determining which premature infants should be screened for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP).

Released:
10-Jul-2018 9:15 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    12-Jul-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 697285

Study Shows Biomarker Panel Boosts Lung Cancer Risk Assessment for Smokers

University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

A four-protein biomarker blood test improves lung cancer risk assessment over existing guidelines that rely solely upon smoking history, capturing risk for people who have ever smoked, not only for heavy smokers, an international research team reports in JAMA Oncology. “This simple blood test demonstrates the potential of biomarker-based risk assessment to improve eligibility criteria for lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography,” said study co-senior author Sam Hanash, M.D., Ph.D., professor of Clinical Cancer Prevention at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

Released:
11-Jul-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 697211

Developmental Screening and Surveillance Rates Remain Low, New Study Suggests

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Only about one-third of young children in the U.S. receive recommended screenings or surveillance designed to catch developmental delays. Findings reveal wide variations in rates across states, with as few as 17 percent of children under three years old receiving developmental screening in the lowest performing state.

Released:
10-Jul-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    3-Jul-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 696799

Surgeons Have Substantial Impact on Genetic Testing in Breast Cancer Patients Who Need It

Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A new study finds surgeon attitudes about genetic testing have a big impact on whether women receive testing after a breast cancer diagnosis.

Released:
28-Jun-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    2-Jul-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 696887

Foleys Aren’t Fun: Patient Study Shows Catheter Risks

Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A new study puts large-scale evidence behind what many hospital patients already know: Having a urinary catheter may help empty the bladder, but it can hurt, lead to urinary tract infections, or cause other issues in the hospital and beyond. In fact, in-depth interviews and chart reviews from more than 2,000 patients shows that more than half of catheterized hospital patients experienced a complication of some kind.

Released:
29-Jun-2018 3:15 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696796

Johns Hopkins Research Points to Increasing Role of Artificial Intelligence in Medical Imaging and Diagnostics

Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory

Researchers from the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Maryland, and collaborators at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, have developed image analysis and machine learning tools to detect age-related macular degeneration, and report in Nature Medicine that such tools can be applied to other image-based medical diagnoses.

Released:
28-Jun-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696576

Mount Sinai Investigation: Clinical Outcomes and Patient Experiences Vastly Improved With Hospital at Home Care

Mount Sinai Health System

A new study to be published online June 25 in JAMA Internal Medicine reports that hospital at home (HaH) care provides a shorter length of stay; reductions in hospital readmissions, emergency department visits, and transfers to skilled nursing facilities; and, improved patient experience versus traditional inpatient care. The study, which spans nearly three years, includes patients with the broadest set of admitting diagnoses ever to be researched, thus strengthening the evidence base for hospital at home care.

Released:
25-Jun-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    22-Jun-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 696312

Health Insurance Plans May Be Fueling Opioid Epidemic

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Health care insurers including Medicare, Medicaid and major private insurers have not done enough to combat the opioid epidemic, suggests a study led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Released:
19-Jun-2018 1:30 PM EDT
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