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  • Embargo expired:
    24-May-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 694888

A Cascade of Immune Processes Offers Insights to Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Researchers at the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center have discovered that tumor cells reprogram metabolic pathways to gain control over a type of immune cell that allows cancer growth.

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21-May-2018 3:45 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695004

Vast Majority of Poor, Urban Women Don’t Use Prenatal Vitamins Before Pregnancy, Study Shows

Johns Hopkins Medicine

A study of more than 7,000 low-income, urban mothers enrolled in the Boston Birth Cohort found that fewer than 5 percent of them started folic acid supplementation and used it almost daily before pregnancy, a widely recommended public health measure designed to prevent potentially crippling birth defects.

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24-May-2018 8:00 AM EDT
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29-May-2018 12:00 AM EDT
Released to reporters:
23-May-2018 11:05 AM EDT

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Article ID: 694984

Social Media Usage Linked to Underage Drinking

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Penn Medicine researchers found a statistically significant relationship between teen and young adult alcohol related social media engagement and both alcohol consumption and alcohol-related problems.

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23-May-2018 8:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 694978

Penn Researchers Identify Cellular Source of Molecule Implicated in Nasal Polyps, Asthma Attacks

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

A new discovery about how the immune system responds to common sinus infections and asthma could explain why patients develop these issues in the first place and ultimately may lead to improved targeted therapies.

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23-May-2018 8:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    22-May-2018 8:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 694467

Early Life Trauma in Men Associated with Reduced Levels of Sperm MicroRNAs

Tufts University

Exposure to early life trauma can elevate risk for poor physical and mental health in individuals and their children. A new epigenetics study in both men and mice posits that some of the vulnerability in children may derive from stress-associated reductions in microRNAs in their father’s sperm.

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17-May-2018 8:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694918

Injectable Bandage Targets Fatal Internal Bleeding

National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

Products are available to quickly seal surface wounds, but rapidly stopping fatal internal bleeding has proven more difficult. Now, biomedical engineers at Texas A&M University are developing an injectable hydrogel bandage that could save lives in emergencies such as penetrating shrapnel wounds on the battlefield.

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22-May-2018 9:30 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    22-May-2018 7:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 694910

Indiana Research Institute Receives $33M NIH Grant to Improve Health Statewide, with Public’s Participation

Indiana University

Indiana’s preeminent research universities are collaborating to improve health through the Indiana Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute, which has recently been awarded more than $33 million in renewed National Institutes of Health funding for the next five years.

Released:
21-May-2018 9:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694906

How Bacteria Behave Differently in Humans Compared to the Lab

Georgia Institute of Technology

Most of what we know today about deadly bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa was obtained from studies done in laboratory settings. Research reported May 14 in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows that this laboratory-based information may have important limits for predicting how these bugs behave once they’ve invaded humans.

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21-May-2018 7:05 PM EDT
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24-May-2018 5:00 PM EDT
Released to reporters:
21-May-2018 5:00 PM EDT

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A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 24-May-2018 5:00 PM EDT


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