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  • Embargo expired:
    17-Aug-2018 10:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 698999

Alcohol Use Disorders Have Long-Term Effects on Brain Structure and Cognitive Function

Research Society on Alcoholism

Alcohol use disorders (AUDs) are known to adversely impact brain structure and function. Although recovery of brain morphology and function has been reported following abstinence from long-term alcohol use, some structural (e.g., brain area volumes and connections) and functional (e.g., cognitive) abnormalities due to long-term effects of AUDs may persist even after abstinence from alcohol. To further our understanding, scientists assessed the consequences of long-term alcohol use on brain circuitry, structural impairment patterns, and the impact of these impairments on cognitive function among individuals with AUDs who were abstinent.

Released:
14-Aug-2018 4:05 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 698937

Mixing Energy Drinks with Alcohol Could Enhance the Negative Effects of Binge Drinking

University of Portsmouth

A key ingredient of energy drinks could be exacerbating some of the negative effects of binge drinking according to a new study.

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14-Aug-2018 6:05 AM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

  • Embargo expired:
    13-Aug-2018 10:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 698754

Liquor Stores are Linked to a Higher Number of Neighborhood Pedestrian Injuries

Research Society on Alcoholism

Pedestrian injuries and fatalities in the U.S. have steadily increased during recent years. In 2015, 5,376 pedestrians were killed and 70,000 injured. Prior research showed an association between the number of neighborhood alcohol stores and risk of pedestrian injury. However, it is unclear whether this was because alcohol stores were located in dense retail areas with already-heavy pedestrian traffic, or whether alcohol stores pose a unique neighborhood risk. This study compared the number of pedestrian injuries that occur near alcohol stores to those that occur near similar retail stores that do not sell alcohol.

Released:
9-Aug-2018 6:05 AM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 698793

Young Drinkers Beware: Binge Drinking May Cause Stroke, Heart Risks

Vanderbilt University Medical Center

You might want to think before you go out drinking again tonight. Research by Mariann Piano, senior associate dean of research at Vanderbilt University School of Nursing, has found that young adults who frequently binge drink were more likely to have specific cardiovascular risk factors such as higher blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar at a younger age than non-binge drinkers.

Released:
9-Aug-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 698644

Got the ‘Drunchies’? New Study Shows How Heavy Drinking Affects Diet

University at Buffalo

With obesity continuing to rise in America, researchers decided to look at a sample of college students to better understand how drinking affects what they eat, both that night and for their first meal the next day.

Released:
7-Aug-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    23-Jul-2018 10:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 697629

The Type and Number of Drinker-related Harms Differ by Proximity and Gender

Research Society on Alcoholism

While many people consider drinking to be a pleasurable activity at home or in social venues with friends, it can result in harm to the user and to others who are affected by the user’s drinking. These harms can include inter-personal violence, fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs), emotional neglect, and social embarrassment, which can adversely affect close relationships, such as with family, and extended relationships, such as with friends, co-workers, and more distant relatives. This study analyzed the impact of having close- and extended-proximity relationships with a harmful drinker among men and women in 10 countries.

Released:
18-Jul-2018 5:05 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 697706

Scientists Reverse Aging-Associated Skin Wrinkles and Hair Loss in a Mouse Model

University of Alabama at Birmingham

When a mutation for mitochondrial dysfunction is induced in a mouse model, the mouse develops wrinkled skin and extensive hair loss in a matter of weeks. This is reversed to normal appearance when mitochondrial function is restored by turning off the gene responsible for mitochondrial dysfunction.

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20-Jul-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 697639

Binge Drinking During Adolescence Impairs Working Memory, Finds Mouse Study

Columbia University Irving Medical Center

Using a mouse model to simulate binge drinking, researchers at Columbia University showed that heavy alcohol use during adolescence damages neurons in the part of the brain involved in working memory.

Released:
19-Jul-2018 10:10 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    18-Jul-2018 6:30 PM EDT

Article ID: 697547

Alcohol-Related Cirrhosis Deaths Skyrocket in Young Adults

Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Federal data shows a 65 percent increase in liver deaths over a seven-year period, according to a study by Michigan Medicine. Alcohol was a major cause but obesity plays a major role in troubling trends in liver mortality.

Released:
17-Jul-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    11-Jul-2018 10:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 697083

Reminder Emails after a Computer-based Intervention Help Some College Students Reduce Their Drinking

Research Society on Alcoholism

College students entering adulthood often drink too much. Negative consequences can include missed classes, poor grades, a wide array of injuries, and even assault. Many academic institutions have addressed this problem by offering computer-delivered interventions (CDIs) for rapid and wide dissemination to students. Although effective in the short term, CDIs are not as helpful longer-term as face-to-face interventions. However, face-to-face interventions are typically only used with students who receive alcohol sanctions, whereas CDIs can be used with large groups (such as student athletes, or all incoming students) and are more cost-effective. This study examined the usefulness of “boosters” – personalized emails sent to post-CDI participants– for maintaining decreased drinking.

Released:
6-Jul-2018 9:35 AM EDT
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