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Article ID: 694987

Active Shooter Detection Systems Could Lock Down Schools, Alert Emergency Responders in Seconds

Intrusion Technologies

Designed by former law enforcement and fire department personnel, active shooter detection and mitigation systems can automatically detect gunshots, aggressive speech, breaking glass, and other violent actions.

Released:
24-May-2018 9:05 AM EDT
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Law and Public Policy

Article ID: 694969

Study: Guns in Chicago Just ‘2.5 Handshakes’ Away

Northwestern University

In one of the first studies to try to map a gun market using network science, researchers used the novel scientific approach to understand how close offenders are to guns in the city of Chicago.

Released:
22-May-2018 5:05 PM EDT
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Law and Public Policy

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Article ID: 694835

Preventing Murder by Addressing Domestic Violence

Case Western Reserve University

Researchers at Case Western Reserve University found 45 percent of victims were at high risk for homicide and severe assault, in a one-year assessment

Released:
21-May-2018 8:05 AM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 694840

LLNL-Led Team Expands Forensic Method to Identify People Using Proteins From Bones

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

A team of researchers led by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has developed a second way to use protein markers from human tissue to identify people – this time from human bones.

Released:
21-May-2018 6:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 694814

NSU Home to National Expert on Campus Shootings / School Violence

Nova Southeastern University

Released:
18-May-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 694807

Federal Judge: Prison Officials May Not Forcibly Cut Rastafarian Inmate’s Dreadlocks, Violate His Religious Freedom

Case Western Reserve University

A team of aw students prevailed in a federal lawsuit arguing that an Ohio inmate should be allowed to keep his dreadlocks, protecting his religious freedom.

Released:
18-May-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Law and Public Policy

  • Embargo expired:
    17-May-2018 4:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 694536

New AJPH Research: Gun Owner Survey, Support for Gun Violence Prevention, Suicide Risk and Gun Ownership, Refugee Mental Health, HPV Vaccine, Indoor Tanning.

American Public Health Association (APHA)

In this issue, find research on gun ownership, support for gun violence prevention, suicide risk and gun ownership, refugee mental health, HPV vaccine and indoor tanning.

Released:
14-May-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    17-May-2018 4:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 694653

Little Difference Between Gun Owners, Non-Gun Owners on Key Gun Policies, Survey Finds

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

A new national public opinion survey from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health finds widespread agreement among gun owners and non-gun owners in their support for policies that restrict or regulate firearms.

Released:
16-May-2018 8:05 AM EDT
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Law and Public Policy

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Article ID: 694733

DHS S&T’s Prepaid Card Reader’s Upgrades Make it Faster and Cheaper!

Homeland Security's Science & Technology Directorate

Using the ERAD Prepaid Card Reader, law enforcement officials can swipe cards and put a temporary hold on the funds until a full investigation may be completed. The upgrade will allow even more agencies to take advantage of the technology.

Released:
17-May-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 694647

Neighborhood Is Key Factor in Recidivism Rates for Ex-Offenders in Arkansas

University of Arkansas at Little Rock

The neighborhood that a person recently released from prison lives in is a key factor in whether that person will eventually return to prison, according to a study by two professors at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock. In their study, “There Goes the Neighborhood? Crime, Blight and Recidivism,” Tusty ten Bensel, associate professor of criminal justice, and Michael Craw, associate professor of public administration, examined whether ex-offenders being released into disadvantaged neighborhoods increased the likelihood of them returning to prison.

Released:
15-May-2018 5:05 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences


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