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  • Embargo expired:
    24-May-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 694888

A Cascade of Immune Processes Offers Insights to Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Researchers at the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center have discovered that tumor cells reprogram metabolic pathways to gain control over a type of immune cell that allows cancer growth.

Released:
21-May-2018 3:45 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    24-May-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 695063

Cancer Cells Co-Opt Pain-Sensing ‘Wasabi Receptor’ to Survive Oxidative Stress

Harvard Medical School

Some cancers express unusually high levels of a neural calcium channel known as the ‘wasabi receptor,’ which plays a role in detecting pain, cold and other sensations. New research finds cancer cells co-opt this neural channel to increase their tolerance against toxic oxidative stress.

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23-May-2018 10:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    24-May-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 695064

A System of Check and Balances in the Blood

University of Vienna

Hematopoietic Stem Cells (HSCs) give rise to blood and immune cells of the body, and are therefore essential for our survival. They are in a dormant state, but whenever new blood needs to be formed, such as after blood loss or chemotherapy, they are rapidly activated to compensate for the loss. After completing their mission, they need to go back to their dormant state. The group of Manuela Baccarini at the Max F. Perutz Laboratories, a joint venture of the University of Vienna and the Medical University of Vienna, has now shown how intracellular signalling can safeguard this delicate balance between activation and dormancy. Their results are published in the prominent journal Cell Stem Cell.

Released:
24-May-2018 4:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 695073

By Forming Clots in Tumors, Immune Cell AIDS Lung Cancer's Spread

University of North Carolina Health Care System

In the journal Nature Communications, researchers report for a particular subset of lung cancer tumors, there is a high prevalence of immune cells called inflammatory monocytes. These immune cells, which normally help to build clotting scaffolds to promote wound healing, also make it possible for tumor cells to migrate and spread to other parts of the body.

Released:
24-May-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 695070

Breast Cancer Survivors Aren’t Getting Recommended Number of Mammograms Post-Surgery, Study Finds

National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®)

A new study in JNCCN finds that, contrary to screening recommendations, mammography rates decline over time as women get further out from their breast cancer diagnosis; African-American women in particular were less likely to receive the recommended amount of screening.

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24-May-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 695044

Researchers Image Cellular Damage Done by Diabetic Retinopathy

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

A new technique offers a 'molecular fingerprint' for functional groups, such as proteins, carbohydrates and lipids, which can signal the development of retinal disease

Released:
23-May-2018 3:40 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695023

How a Cell Knows When To Divide

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

How does a cell know when to divide? We know that hundreds of genes contribute to a wave of activity linked to cell division, but to generate that wave new research shows that cells must first grow large enough to produce four key proteins in adequate amounts.

Released:
23-May-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695025

In a Break with Dogma, Myelin Boosts Neuron Growth in Spinal Cord Injuries

University of California San Diego Health

In a new paper, published in the May 23 online issue of Science Translational Medicine, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine report that adult rat myelin actually stimulated axonal outgrowth in rat neural precursor cells (NPCs) and human induced pluripotent (iPSC)-derived neural stem cells (NSCs).

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23-May-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695018

Researchers investigate link between DNA replication in HPV and cancer

University of Delaware

University of Delaware researchers are investigating genetic variations in DNA replication of human papillomaviruses (HPV) and its correlation with HPV-related cancers. The research illustrates specific changes in DNA sequences in HPV that correlate with cancer prognosis.

Released:
23-May-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695002

HHMI Chooses Four ASCB Members to Join 2018 Investigator Cadre

American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB)

Four ASCB members were chosen to receive investigator funding from HHMI.

Released:
23-May-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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