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Article ID: 695071

Study Finds Black Americans Face Education, Income Barriers to Healthy Behaviors

University of Iowa

A new University of Iowa–led study reports educational opportunities and higher incomes may be key to closing the health gap between most black and white Americans. Researchers say socioeconomic factors, mainly wealth and education, influenced the differences in health behaviors between the groups more than other variables.

Released:
24-May-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 694987

Active Shooter Detection Systems Could Lock Down Schools, Alert Emergency Responders in Seconds

Intrusion Technologies

Designed by former law enforcement and fire department personnel, active shooter detection and mitigation systems can automatically detect gunshots, aggressive speech, breaking glass, and other violent actions.

Released:
24-May-2018 9:05 AM EDT
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Law and Public Policy

Article ID: 695028

New Book Focuses on Impact of Online Content Moderators

Cornell University

In his new book, “Custodians of the Internet: Platforms, Content Moderation, and the Hidden Decisions that Shape Social Media,” Tarleton Gillespie investigates how social media platforms police what we post online, and the large societal impact of these decisions.

Released:
23-May-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 694993

​Why an Upcoming Appointment Makes Us Less Productive

Ohio State University

You’ve got a full hour until your next meeting. But you probably won’t make the most of that time, new research suggests. In a series of eight studies, both in the lab and real life, researchers found that free time seems shorter to people when it comes before a task or appointment on their calendar.

Released:
23-May-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Embargo will expire:
25-May-2018 10:00 AM EDT
Released to reporters:
22-May-2018 3:05 PM EDT

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 25-May-2018 10:00 AM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 694925

UNH Researchers Find Invasive Seaweed Makes Fish Change Their Behavior

University of New Hampshire

When it comes to finding protection and a safe feeding ground, fish rely on towering blades of seaweed, like kelp, to create a three-dimensional hiding space. Kelp forests have been shown to be one of the most productive systems in the ocean with high biodiversity and ecological function. However, in recent decades, many kelp habitats have been taken over and replaced by lower turf-dominated seaweed species. Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have found that this change in the seascape may impact the behavior of fish and could be leaving them less options for refuge and more vulnerable to predators.

Released:
22-May-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    22-May-2018 10:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 694795

Facebook and Twitter Postings May Indicate a Drinking Problem

Research Society on Alcoholism

Despite the pervasive use of social media by young adults, little is known about whether, and how, social-media engagement influences their drinking patterns and risk of alcohol-related problems. Reviews thus far have looked at drinking relative to risky behaviors and advertising. This review examined associations between young adults’ alcohol-related social-media activity – defined as posting, liking, commenting on, and viewing of alcohol-related content on social media – and their drinking behaviors and alcohol-related problems.

Released:
18-May-2018 5:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 694899

Income Inequality Is Changing the Nature of How Parents Invest in Their Kids, Widening Class Divides in the U.S.

American Sociological Association (ASA)

A new study shows that rising income inequality in the U.S. has led affluent parents to increase spending on their children, widening the gap in child investment along class lines. The results suggest that income inequality erodes the equality of opportunity by increasing gaps between children from a young age.

Released:
22-May-2018 12:05 AM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 694898

What an All-Nighter Does to Your Blood

University of Colorado Boulder

A new study looking at proteins in the blood over the 24-hour-cycle found 30 that vary depending on what time it is, and more than 100 that are disrupted by a simulated night shift

Released:
21-May-2018 5:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694880

Bulldogs in Australia: CHARGE Syndrome Conference Takes MSU Faculty, Grad Students on Research Adventure

Mississippi State University

School psychology doctoral students in Mississippi State’s College of Education are participating in the 13th Biennial CHARGE Syndrome Conference in Melbourne, Australia. Accompanying the students is MSU Assistant Professor of School Psychology Kasee Stratton-Gadke, a leading researcher of CHARGE Syndrome and founder and director of MSU’s Bulldog CHARGE Syndrome Research Lab, one of only two in the world where researchers are uncovering breakthroughs in treatment and prevention and providing crucial support to parents, families and physicians caring for individuals with the rare genetic condition.

Released:
21-May-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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Education


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