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Embargo will expire:
23-May-2018 5:45 AM EDT
Released to reporters:
21-May-2018 6:00 AM EDT

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A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 23-May-2018 5:45 AM EDT

Article ID: 694287

Caterpillar ‘Road Rage’ Could Affect Migration

University of Georgia

Monarch butterfly caterpillars living next to roads may be stressed by the sound of passing cars and trucks, according to a new study from the University of Georgia.

Released:
9-May-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694219

Migratory Animals Carry More Parasites, Says Study

University of Georgia

Every year, billions of animals migrate across the globe, carrying parasites with them and encountering parasites through their travels. Now, a team of researchers at the University of Georgia’s Odum School of Ecology discovered that animals known to migrate long distances are infected by a greater number of parasite species than animals that do not migrate.

Released:
8-May-2018 3:25 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694123

Conjoined Deer Fawns Offer Glimpse Into Rare Wildlife Deformity

University of Georgia

Conjoined twin fawns, which were stillborn, are believed to be the first ones found to have reached full term and then be delivered by their mother.

Released:
7-May-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    25-Apr-2018 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 693449

Massive Study Across Western Equatorial Africa Finds More Gorillas and Chimpanzees Than Expected, but 80% Are Outside the Safe Havens of Protected Areas

Wildlife Conservation Society

A massive decade-long study of Western Equatorial Africa’s gorillas and chimpanzees has revealed that there are one third more western lowland gorillas and one tenth more central chimpanzees than previously thought. The bad news: the vast majority of these great apes (80 percent) exist outside of protected areas, and gorilla populations are declining by 2.7 percent annually.

Released:
25-Apr-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 693309

Landmark Paper Finds Light at End of the Tunnel for World’s Wildlife and Wild Places

Wildlife Conservation Society

A new WCS paper published in the journal BioScience finds that the enormous trends toward population stabilization, poverty alleviation, and urbanization are rewriting the future of biodiversity conservation in the 21st century, offering new hope for the world’s wildlife and wild places.

Released:
23-Apr-2018 3:40 PM EDT
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Article ID: 693245

Body's Natural High, Prescription Drug Misuse, Health Implications of Legalized Marijuana, and More in the Marijuana News Source

Newswise

The Latest News On Marijuana Research

Released:
20-Apr-2018 3:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 686324

Costa’s Hummingbirds, White-Tailed Deer and Malaria, Coffee Commitment, and more in the Wildlife News Source

Newswise

The latest research and experts on Wildfires in the Wildlife News Source

Released:
20-Apr-2018 2:25 PM EDT
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Law and Public Policy

Article ID: 692853

Course Set to Overcome ‘Mismatch’ Between Lab-Designed Nanomaterials and Nature’s Complexity

American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Advances in nanotechnology have made it possible to control the size, shape, composition, elasticity and chemical properties of laboratory-made nanomaterials. Yet many of these materials do not to function as expected in the body. In a recent issue of Biointerphases, the team homes in on biomembranes -- the gatekeeping bilipid-layers and proteins surrounding cells. They explore the barriers a synthetic nanomaterial must breach to enter a cell and achieve its intended purpose.

Released:
16-Apr-2018 9:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 692264

Like Human Societies, Whales Value Culture and Family Ties

Florida Atlantic University

Through a detailed genetic study of kinship, an international team is the first to demonstrate that just like human societies, beluga whales appear to value culture as well as their ancestral roots and family ties. They have demonstrated that related whales returned to the same locations year after year, and even generation after generation.

Released:
5-Apr-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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